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. while they try to make the deficit and debt reduction their signature issue is a former house and senate budget committee staffer, i believe that is safe only plan. they will be subordinate deficit reduction to giving tax breaks to the wealthy contributors. and that romney's current tax plan is a case in point. it would increase the deficit by $6 trillion over 10 years. ask yourself now, which loophole is he going to cause to make up the difference? he doesn't say and there aren't enough loopholes to do that in any case. most middle-class people like you do not consider the mortgage interest deduction to be a loophole. unlike the deductibility. and in the recent past, congressional republicans have refused to repeal that even the egregious tax loophole a corporate jet to the deficit claims are essentially fraudulent. it's simply bait for the rooms. and yes, they consider all of you to be potential. chapter five of the book describes republican tax policy as follows, quote, although you won't find it in their party platform, the gop's mission is to protect and further enrich america's plu
talking about the deficit. much of the reason is that when you look at states, iowa and new hampshire in particular, this is an issue that resonates as an almost psychic quality that resonates in this region. i think that that is one thing to keep in mind, one of the ways in which you have these kind of strands that don't always coherent way that works for you. i think that that is one thing to keep in mind. you know, it's really interesting to think about. you have this vaccination for much of the country. the broader swath of the electorate. .. gotten it right in talking about how we actually care about the safety. it matters a lot in a free enterprise society geared we actually need to have this. or it's not actually some kind of saying that we garnish on this ballot, but an incredibly important part of making the whole system work. the problem is that ryan, the reason he excited at this as further reason, the way he gives a very apocalyptic language of the threats to free a price and what have you. that is one reasons why governors have a big advantage over legislators. someone li
, it also goes a long way in reducing the budget deficit. even by washington standards, that all seems important. to discuss the cliff and the consequences, we have a panel of four budget watchers. bob greenstein is head of the president obama's transition policy work. doug holz-eakin, president of the action forum, headed the staff, directer of the congressional budget office. he was a member of the president bush's economic adviser and was an acting directer of cbo. finally, diane lim rogers blog z as economist mom and was chief economist for the house committee and the ways and means committee. our format today will be relatively straightforward. each speaks for five minutes, and i'll ask questions, we'll l get a discussion going here and turn it over to the audience to give you a chance to ask the questions. we've people watching on c-span and the web, and if you're not in the room, send them to publicaffairs@urban.org, and those questions will come to me. to start, donald? >> thanks. thanks, everybody, for being here and braving the rain to talk fiscal cliffs. i'll try not to ruin
of the numbers that were given to us, the measures come in the forecast of deficit consideration that was expected, and we did say at the time that the timing seemed too short to us. pleased to see that this is being hurt. >> i'm jacob from the peterson institute. i guess this is sort of a follow-up question from the previous question about greece -- >> i saw you were taking notes. >> yes. my question really goes, you mention angel remarks that there should be less focus on targets rather than implement a measure. >> with respect to greece, if we go back to march and the process back then this year, there was a very specific target, maybe the long-term 127 was looming very large in that debate and you just mentioned that the role of the debt to sustain the analysis worked. but this sort of de-emphasizing of targets, should it be interpreted as the debt sustainability target in next year you're saying is less relevant perhaps for the continuing fund intervention? and if so, does that mean that the long-term debt sustainability target is ultimately going to be achieved by the direc
want to pay 1 dollar for it. dilemma has three governors in prison for $15 billion deficit. if they want to pay, that's the problem. misery needs to make the tough decisions. should they be put in the mix of whether we've reduced 70 or high-speed rail? is probably in the mix, but i don't think is before us now. i want to see what the load factors to be. that's my world. i want to see supply and demand. if the demand there? will supply. if not, we're not in a position to build it and they will come. we are just not there. >> jim higgins. >> okay, well i am not a transportation expert and i don't think these guys are either. actually i graduated from school as a civil engineer, but they work five years as a civil engineer, but lately i've computers. but why should a bureaucrat decide, you know, what mode of transportation is best, whether we have rail or highway is? it got us in trouble in the beginning. we built all these highways. we overdo it on the highways. now we have pollution and gas consumption because some bureaucrat decided that we needed highways. while now were t
time. [laughter] on the deficit, it was, you know, deficit doesn't matter. and yeah and biology too a guy in missouri too. so the question to me is what happens the morning after the morning after the election if romney loses? the morning after they'll say it wasn't because he wasn't far night enough. i wonder the morning after the morning after. a lot of people say we have gone too far to the right. we need a different republican party. we need a center right republican party. i think the country needs. because it needs to be a check on the left and the center left, and it's the only way we're going get big comprises on the big issues. >> can i add, i mean, a little history can clinton and rage. the second term was the productive term. the big achievement. it's hard no know whether the republican party will -- where they will push the blame if that happens. but the question is how they decide to spend the next four years. and i think it's very hard to tell. but there is some hope in looking back at both clinton and reagan. >> reagan was considered a far-right lunatic running a far
a fiscal deficit problem or whether it has to be solved. a year ago that was debated and now the debate is however going to solve the? are we going to solve it on the revenue side? are we going to to solve it on the expenditure side? there is no one who is saying we should widen the deficit. everyone exceeds to it that the real debate is about how we get it done and also the nature of the government that is the consequence of how gets them. obviously government will grow. if you shrink the budget the government will retract and that has implications to the budget. it's an ongoing debate always in america but if you think about what has been accomplished in the last year everyone knows we have to solve the problem. how to solve what has resulted in an impasse and, but the fact that everybody agrees it needs to be solved is really the most important thing. >> but it seems to me that it's a math problem and as you said, if you have got you know slow but stable growth for an extended period of time here than ultimately the raponos have to go up and expenditures have to go down. neither of w
, young adult population. we haven't quite recognized the deficit we have their. as for the state level i think a lot has happened. we work of the state level and attempt to put together work of kids through consumption properly taken care of and educated and carried from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more and more business people who get the reality. the hour understanding with the situation as they are increasingly ready to take action in this area that supported salles solomon to resolve problems we find the report last march from pre-que to the cost and difficulty through kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields the reduction in special-education alone. so what is -- there is that the state level this understanding to take place and people can act on it and it can be done on a school district level. so in many respects, the power of technology and communications for this enabling people and local levels to act in ways they cannot at federally and as the act in the region and the state level it becomes then clear of the federal level what needs to be done, so from my stand
to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president biden's chief of staff, talking about the economic crisis in 2011, that's exactly what is going on. there is so much evidence that it is the biggest future. we are on the path becoming europe and greece. you just can't keep borrowing money. there is a stunning and fiction in this country, and we need some sort of we need some serious intervention. in the book, what i attempt to do is take people to the presidents and leaders and tell you exactly because of the luxury of time and my publisher, simon & schuster, i declined to get the meeting notes to get the exact detail to interview president obama and speaker boehner and the key players in this. i just want to take one quick snapshot from what happened that we didn't know about, which is critical. when the cops pull up less when the president was upset, he called the congressional leaders on a saturday morning at 11:00 o'clock a.m. the democratic and republican leaders were trying to work out their own deal. harry reid, the democratic leader, said to the president,
, and we could lose our country. >>> ross perot interviewed by usa today on the economy, deficit, and debt, and how it changed since he ran for president in 1992 and 1996. find his article in "usa today," and usatoday.com. ross perot tonight on c-span at 9 eastern. >> the substance abuse and mental health services administration recently released their annual report and found that 22.5 million americans aged 12 and older use illicit drugs and rates remain stable since the last survey in 2010. marijuana continues to be the most commonly used drug. the latest 2011 national survey on drug use and health marks the 23rd national observance of national recovery month. >> already. good morning. doctor wesley clark, director of the center of behavior statistics and quality and substance use -- [inaudible] on behalf of samsha, i welcome you here. we have the observance of recovery month, and the theme this year is join the voices for recovery, it's worth it. indeed, as we look at favorable results depicted in the data today, we're making progress, but we have to remain vigilant as much needs to be
dollar for it. illinois has three governors in prison and a 15 billion-dollar deficit if they want to pay for it that is their problem. missouri has to be responsible and make the tough decisions to read should be put in the mix of what we do the high-speed rail? it's probably in the mix but i don't think that is before us right now. i want to see with a factor would be. that's my world. i want to see supply and demand. if it's not there we are not in the position to build it and they will come. we are just not there. >> moderator: jim higgins? higgins: okay. i am not a transportation expert, and i don't think that these guys are either. i graduate from school as a civil engineer and i worked five years as a civil engineer but i haven't lately working on computers. why should a bureaucrat decide, which, what mode of transportation is the best? what we have rail or highways it got a central in the beginning. we build all of these highways. we overdid it on the highway. now we have our pollution and gas consumption because some bureaucrat decided that we needed highways. now we are trying t
do anything to create a job, do anything to educate a child or do anything to bring down the deficit. but attempts at attacks and character assassination the way that mr. powell's been about tonight, frankly, make it a lot harder to solve problems, to compromise, to sit down and actually get something done. but i think that, mr. powell, you underestimate the decency of the voters of the seventh district, and i've had the privilege of representing this district for almost 12 years. and i can tell you we're honest and hard working people, and i have every confidence that the voters are going to reject your negative campaign. but i want to end this debate where we began. this election is about the future and about what kind of country we want to be. now, there's one path that i've advocated, lower taxes, less regulation that will produce more jobs. mr. powell's view is we need to raise taxes, we need government coming in and imposing regulation on businesses. but the fact is, we all know that the unprecedented prosperity of america did not come because the government just spent more mon
into recession and cost too many jobs of the other hand would also go a long way to produce budget deficits. even by washington standards that seems pretty important. to discuss the cliff and its consequences of a panel of the four but it did it cover in budget watchers. bob greenstein is on the senate priorities and that of president obama's transition team policy work. douglas holtz-eakin is president of the american action forum and headed the domestic policy staff in the campaign ad was the director of the congressional budget office. donald marron is the director of the tax policy center and member of george bush's advisor and acting director of cbo and finally, digamma rogers blogs as an economist and was the chief economist of the house budget committee for the democratic staff of the house ways and means committee. the format today will be relatively straightforward. each of the panelists will speak for five minutes. i will ask some questions and we will get a discussion going up here and then turn to the audience to give you all a chance to ask questions. we have people watching on c-spa
raised levels of almost 4% of gdp in 2010 and we see that today deficit is tomorrows taxes and the market always punishes the lack of fiscal irresponsibility. that is why expanding the public debt is to stimulate the economy and we understood that. once you do if you have to take measures to rebuild your finances. the big mistake made by the many economy starting the crisis was to forget that we can use the public deficits like this. but if you try to use it on a regular basis, you will face sooner or later problems in the deficit and that is exactly what is happening with several economies in europe right now. that is why we've put in place an exit strategy to regain the fiscal balance including several painful measures. for instance increasing the tax revenues come producing the public expenditures, promoting the reforms and the deregulation program. we also sit down with a very inefficient energy company which saves the government more than $5 billion a year in subsidies. thanks to the fiscal discipline, the public debt is a historical low level. more than twice the amount of the total
to have an awful lot of training. >> host: tom, is the trade deficit a bad thing? necessarily? i mean, in and of itself? >> guest: well, a sustained deficit gets you in trouble because that indicates you are consuming more than you produce, but trade deficit was not a great concern, but over time with the deficit, that's going -- you'll pay for that one way or another. in the current campaign, one of the commercials broadcast in some of the battleground states like this area is the china commercial, mitt romney accusing president obama of allowing the chinese to cheat as it were, and that manufacturing jobs for the first time, more manufacturing jobs in china and the obama administration's responding. is that a fair fight? is that a fair issue? >> guest: you know, china has to live up to its obligations under the world trade organization like anyone else, but, you know, here we in the mall, washington monument there, white house there, constitution avenue. when you see the chinese feeling what really is of value, it's hiding in plain sight, the declaration of independence and the bill
some of the deficits. we're going to do my portion very quickly because what's really interesting of course is what our general palace have to say. let me start by introducing a. on my right is hugh halpern, staff director for the u.s. house of representatives committee on rules. on the committee serves as chairman david tries chief adviser on committee and leadership that is the to my leftist jim harper, director of information policy studies at the cato institute and is also the founder of washington watchdog, which keeps a very close eye on legislation and federal spending. chimp has asked me to mention washington watch.com several times during the course of the presentation. and last but not least john who is the policy director at the sunlight foundation and all around transparency gaslight. that is part of his official title. there's more information on your chairs. i'd like to thank representatives who are the co-chairs of the congressional transparency caucus. for giving us the space and aberdeen to have a conversation with you here today. like is that i promise i'll be br
112 congress and also identify some of the deficits. we are going to do my speaking portion very quickly because it's really interesting is of course a panelist on to say. to mr. for introducing them. on my right is hugh halpern, staff director for the u.s. house of representatives committee and rules. on the committee is served us chief advisor. immediately to my left is jim harper, director of policy studies at the cato institute and also the founder of washington watch.com, which keeps a close eye on legislation and federal funding. jenna sasser to mention washington watch.com at least several times during the course of this presentation. last but not least is john wonderlich, policy director at all about transparency guide. that is his official title. more information about today's panel under chairs and also at transparency cockiest.org. i would like to thank representative issa andrew gray, cochairs of the congressional congress for giving us the space to have >> thanks, daniel. thanks to you and the advisory committee and the sunlight foundation for having me this afternoo
't get a debate in the united states of whether the u.s. has a fiscal deficit problem or whether it has to be solved. a year ago, that would have been debated. now the debate is how are we going to solve it? solve it on the revenue side? solve it on the expenditure side? there's no one who is saying we have to widen the deficit or the deficit, as wide as it is, it's not a problem. everyone exceeds to it, but the debate is about how to get it done, and also, the nature of the government that's the consequence of how it gets done. if you spend more, government grows. if you shrink the budget, government contracts, and that has implications for the republic that have been debated since jefferson and hmm lton. it's an ongoing debate always in america, but if you think about what's been accomplished in the last year, everyone knows we have to solve the problem. how we solve it resulted in the impasse, but the fact everyone agrees it needs to be solved is really the most important thing. >> but it seems to me that it's a math problem, and as you said, if you've got, you know, slow, but stable
choosing between current job creation and growth on the one hand, and deficit reduction on the other hand is a false choice. deficit reduction enacted now with enforceable limitation of limited period down the road would provide time, hopefully, for recovery to take gold and could contribute significantly to that recovery by ginger in economic confidence and by creating a fiscal content that would allow a stimulus. more broadly, the hamilton project convenes to liberation of her aspects of our broader shorter-term duress, including stimulus and mortgage relief. but our primary focus continues to be long-term economic policy. turning to the longer-term, our country has enormous strengths, dynamic and entrepreneur culture or ask not your resource, rule of law, flexible labor and capital markets, and so much else. dust, -- that's there are immediate hardships to be addressed. we are well-positioned to succeed for the transforming global economy. however realizing that potential requires sound fiscal conditions instead of the current unsustainable and dangers fiscal trajectory, strong public
in the senate, his fiscal policies turned masses surpluses into massive deficits. the federal deficit went up $16,000 every second george allen was the united states senator. voted to raise the debt ceiling four times, voted to raise his own salary four times. now he's talking like a conservative, but his record shows he can't have another crack at it because his actions don't match his word. again, i think the right strategy is an aggregated examination of deductions rather than fighting issue-to-issue. you can have the amount or percentage vary by income or how the tax code is already. that's the most likely path to lead to success. >> we're out of time on that answer. >> can i have time to rebut? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll
reducing the deficit making huge profits returning record amounts of money to the treasury as a result of all of their previous quantitative easing. so, the opposite of spending your tax dollars is true it of course the fed is legally independent and run by a diet that is appointed by george w. bush. so this is so completely over the top that we decided we've got to do a piece on that particular e-mail. but pretty much of the messages to the true believers have got to exceed what we in the bunker before we pay much attention to them. as the nec we are out of time. thank you for your attention and appreciate your questions. [applause] speed in the transition we are going to ask the second panel to come up and area video we have produced to help stations engage in ad watching in the local broadcasts. we know that when the ad is added full stream you increase the likelihood that the ad is believed and you don't hear the reporter. swedes distributed with the annenberg foundation. if we could play that please, gary. >> what's the difference between seeing this, traffic lights in china and t
is romney talking about the deficits, debt and deficit given that we have the employment crisis and much of the reason is the new look at the states they thought of as a target of violent hampshire this is just an issue that resume sit it is almost a kind of psychic quality that resonates and i think that that is one thing to keep in mind and you have these kind of strands that do not always come here and a way that works for you if you are a candidate so that is wanting to keep in mind. it's interesting to think about when you have this kind of stagnation for the high end but a broad swath of the electorate. what does it mean. one thing it means is this not enrollment in the last two or three years to get medicaid. when bill clinton gave a talk at the democratic national convention to was incredibly shrewd because he didn't talk about medicare they talk about medicare it's a real wedge into the numbers between the two campaigns. a really is medicaid and it's a lot of white working-class folks as well as the underrepresented minority backgrounds as well. so, i think that when you think a
graduates a four-point deficit, and the right hand column you see how much demographic change we have just in the last four years based on current population survey eligible voters. according to be sedated, we've seen an increase of three points in the share of eligible voters were minority's and a decrease of three points in the share of voters who are white noncollege or working class. that's quite a lot of change in a short period of time. let's just think a bit about what these figures mean, the figures from 2008 and the figures for today. even though it looks like the minority vote usher should go up, let's just say it does not. but let's say that obama gets again the 80% of the minority vote he got in the 2008. let's get nearly loses white college graduates by four-point. it means that you actually be competitive in this race, mitt romney would have to get double john mccain's margin of 18 points among the white working class in this election. that's youth turnout doesn't change among minority's despite the shifts in eligible voters. if this does get realize, let's say minority vote
creation and growth on the one hand and deficit reduction on the other hand is a false choice. deficit reduction with enforceable limitations, and limited period on the road, it will provide time for recovery to take hold and could contribute significantly to that recovery. by generating economic confidence and creating a fiscal responsibility. our country has enormous drinks. vast natural resources, the rule of law, flexible labor and capital markets. we have a strong public investment critical to economic success red and perform non-budgetary areas such as health care immigration and k-12 education and so much else. as you know, there are enormous policy differences and all of these areas. substantively, they could leverage to move forward effectively in each area. however, that will only happen if our elected officials are in the final analysis, committed to effective government. and that means working across party lines and different opinions to make politically tough decisions. that takes us to today's program. strategies of the long-term success of the american economy must focus
, the deficit and debt and how it's changed since he ran for president in 1992 and '96. find richard wolffe's article in today's edition of "usa today" and at usa today.com. raz perot tonight -- ross perot tonight on c-span at 9 eastern. >>> next, a look at the presidential campaign with libertarian party candidate gary johnson. the former republican governor of new mexico talks about his view of the two-party system and obstacles for third-party candidates. from "washington journal," this is 40 minutes. >> host: joining us now is gary johnson, the former governor of new mexico, a republican 1995-2003 who is now the libertarian presidential nominee, and gary johnson, first question. when you look at the major party candidates and this year's cycle, what's missing in the debate and the dialogue? and what do you wring to the table -- what do you bring to the table? >> guest: well, how about truth for starters. the notion that both obama and romney are arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare when we need to have a raging debate and discussion in this country on how we slash me
six in 10 gop interest group ads focus on jobs and deficit. romney is a let's focus on the deficit. he has spent most is how i'm talking about jobs, and on health care and taxes in about one out of every to as progressive democrats have a much wider spread on issues that they are discussing dick so i will leave it there for now. [applause] >> thanks, eric. okay, so shadow money. this is a subset of t outside money we are seeing coming into the elections. and we are seeing much more of this time around, these are the 501(c), especially 501(c)(4) groups that are increasing active in politics an increasingly active on the airwaves. first a word about, the center for responsive politics. what we do it in a summit with us is we slice and dice campaign finance and lobbying information in ways that hopefully make it more accessible and usable and easier to interpret for both journalists and the public. we've been trying to get at this dark money, shadow money this year, and you know, the danger for journalists and for us, for the public is, you know, it's very, very difficult to get at it, ta
of mobility assisted equipment for beneficiaries with mobility deficits that impair their ability to accomplish activities of daily living within the home. this policy guides coverage for all mobility equipment from cains and crutches to walkers to manual wheelchairs all the way up to power wheelchairs. to make a decision about which device is appropriate cms national coverage policy recovers a systemic evaluation of the beneficiary by their treating physician in order to determine which item optimally meets the beneficiary's mobile needs. in addition to this cms national poll the dme macs have local coverage policy for power me built device. this local policy pulls together national policy requirements and organizes the nearly 60 individual power mobility codes into five groups of similar products. sets out the criteria for each group and explains the documentation requirements and coding guidelines. in other words, the local policy takes coverage of payment information from various sources adds additional necessary details for proper claim submission and incorporates those into
to national security. back then in 1988, democrats were in the middle of a 30-year, 35-point deficit when it came to voter trust on national security. that security gap began in the aftermath of the vietnam war and persisted very stubbornly until about 2008 when it closed up due mostly to republican mistakes. voters were tired of the iraq war, tired of the kind of blundering that they had perceived in the bush administration and decided that both parties, there was kind of a pox on both houses. what's been very interesting -- and third way has been partnering with our own polling and focus groups for the last seven years -- is that if you look at this slide, that's the security gap. if you extend it out to the left, it gets wide and absolutely consistent going all the way back to about 1972. but you could see where it closed up in '07-08 because of the iraq war, and now it's closed up again. and the interesting thing about that is it's at zero now because we have a president who has had an enormously successful first term when it comes to national security. when we did focus groups on thi
a good game but the fact of the matter is i've been working to bring down this deficit for years, and it's very important that we do this for the very reason that was just said about national security. but let's examine the facts. my number one, two and three binaries are creating jobs in the state of nevada. we hope small businesses. we make nevada the energy jobs capital of the united states. we create good paying jobs right here in the state of nevada. help our tourism, our tourism industry create good paying jobs, but my opponent doesn't get anything from the income families and it doesn't do anything to get people back to work. while i'm putting day and night to make sure that we get good paying jobs that we keep people in their homes, that we protect medicare and social security, and we stand with our veterans. my opponent is voting for budget after budget that takes away, that balances our budget on the backs of our senior citizens and our veterans turn for the next question is from ray hagar. spent senator heller, and 2011 he voted twice for republican budget plan that would've c
and it is produced -- it has produced record-setting deficits and putting us in a path of greece and where much of europe are. the economy is teetering on the edge of recession. the were seen can do is jacked up taxes on small businesses and entrepreneurs or job creators. that makes it all the more likely to push us into a recession. and for the 23 million people who struggling for work, the worst thing to do is hurt the small businesses that create those jobs. >> it is fair to say that the president has reduced taxes. he has reduced taxes for small businesses 18 times. he cut taxes for '95 -- for 95% of families out there. the question is do we ask everybody to sacrifice? when you look at the marginal rate in the united states, when ronald reagan took office, the marginal office with 71% to 72%. it is interesting to me that the greatness that people speak of in terms of the united states, when we talk about the 1940's, the 1950's, the 1960's, 1970's, the marginal rate that folks paid was much greater. nobody says we will go back to that. at the same time, during the clinton years, we had margi
investment, rising food prices and bigger trade deficits. but it's completely wrong to suggest that the arab spurring has created these problems. it's a challenging time for the world economy as a whole and there won't be a transformation overnight because far from being successful, open market-based economies by the vested interests, corruption and institutions, and if you like created a double problem not just fragile economies but people were told their experience free enterprise markets what that experience nothing of the sort so we must help these countries unwind the legacy of endemic corruption. another three expenditure they can't afford. natural resources unfairly exploited and they suffered under for too long. while i'm on the subject of the stolen essence, we also have a responsibility to help these countries get back the stolen assets that are rightfully theirs just as we returned billions of dollars of assets to libya. it's not good enough the egyptian people continue to be denied these assets long after mubarak is gone and i'm announcing a british task force to work with the go
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31